Publications by Kumu Art Museum 2015

Ants Laikmaa. Vigala and Capri
laikmaa_kaas_näidis.indd

Edited by Liis Pählapuu
Texts by Liis Pählapuu and Bart Pushaw
Designed by Liina Siib
192 pp.In Estonian and English, illustrated
Published by the Art Museum of Estonia – Kumu Art Museum
Tallinn 2015

ISBN 978-9949-485-42-0

May 2016 marks the 150th anniversary of the birth of Ants Laikmaa. The book “Ants Laikmaa. Vigala and Capri” supplements the exhibition of Laikmaa’s works at the Kumu Art Museum (11.09.2015–17.02.2016). It has been quite a while since the creative legacy of the pioneer of Estonian art Ants Laikmaa (1866−1942) was last closely observed. With the aim of focussing attention on the duality of Laikmaa’s personality, the curator of the exhibition, Liis Pählapuu, has pointed out the two locations in the subtitle of the exhibition: Vigala in Läänemaa County, where the artist was born and to which he remained attached until the end of his life, and the distant island of Capri, where he seems to have spent the happiest and most productive period of his life as a travelling artist. Laikmaa’s role as an initiator, ideologist and educator on the local art scene, along with his western Estonian landscapes and portraits of local people, are so significant in Estonian art history that the other half of his personality − his passion for travelling, curiosity about strange cultures, and receptiveness to new impulses – has been somewhat overlooked. That is why the second article in the book – Bart Pushaw’s treatment of Laikmaa’s art during his North African period – is particularly exciting.

20 €

IV B. Addenda to Soviet-era art history 2
Art Revolution 1966
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Edited by Anu Allas
Texts by Anu Allas and Margus Kiis
Designed by Külli Kaats
136 pp.
In Estonian and English, illustrated
Published by the Art Museum of Estonia – Kumu Art Museum
Tallinn 2015

ISSN 2382-8048
ISBN 978-9949-485-40-6

The book accompanies the exhibition of the same name at Kumu Art Museum (17.04.–16.08.2015) and is the second book from the “Addenda to Soviet-era art history” series. In 1966, several ground-breaking exhibitions were organised in Tallinn and Tartu, where the works on display daringly distanced themselves from the canon of official Soviet art. This book focuses on the attempts of young artists to expand the borders of realism.

10 €